DONATE HERE

Home

Adoption
 How to adopt,
Available pets

Licensing

Pet Lost/Found, Surrender and Reclaim

Library
Laws, Forms & Info

Want to Help?
Volunteer opportunities
Shelter needs
Fostering
Volunteer Orientations

Employment Opportunities

Fees for Services

Contact Us


Shelter Hours

Tues - Fri, 9:30-5:30
Sat, 9:30-4:00
Adoptions stop 1/2 hour prior to closing.

On the 3rd Thursday of each month, we close 1/2 hour early for a staff meeting.

Identification and reclaim of stray pets is available Monday through Sunday, from 9:30am to 10pm.

Animal Services will be closed:

May 28
Jul 2
Sep 3
Nov 11
Nov 24-25
Dec 24
Dec 31

 

Common Poisonous Plants
from the Human Society of the United States

While plants add a touch of color and fragrance to our daily lives they also inject an element of danger into the lives of our pets. More than 700 plants have been identified as producing physiologically active or toxic substances in sufficient amounts to cause harmful effects in animals. Poisonous plants produce a variety of toxic substances and cause reactions ranging from mild nausea to death. Certain animal species may have a peculiar vulnerability to a potentially poisonous plant.

Below is a list of some of the common plants which may produce a toxic reaction in animals. This list is intended only as a guide to plants which are generally identified as having the capability for producing a toxic reaction.

PLANT TOXIC PARTS PLANT TYPE
Aconite roots, foliage, seeds garden flower
Apple seeds cultivated tree
Arrowgrasses leaves marsh plants
Atropa belladonna entire plant esp. seeds, roots garden herb
Autumn Crocus entire plant garden flower
Azaleas entire plant cultivated & wild shrub
Baneberry berries, roots wildflower
Bird-of-Paradise pods garden flower
Black locust entire plant esp. bark, shoots tree
Bloodroot entire plant esp. stem, roots wildflower, herb
Box entire plant esp. leaves ornamental shrub
Buckeye sprouts, nuts, seeds tree
Buttercup entire plant esp. leaves wildflower, garden herb
Caladium entire plant house plant
Carolina jessamine flowers, leaves ornamental plant
Castor bean entire plant esp. beans house plant
Chinaberry tree berries tree
Chokecherries leaves, cherries, pit wild shrub
Christmas berry leaves shrub
Christmas Rose rootstock, leaves garden flower
Common privet leaves, berries ornamental shrub
Corn cockle seeds wildflower, weed
Cowbane entire plant esp. roots wildflower, herb
Cow cockle seeds wildflower, weed
Cowslip entire plant esp. leaves, stem wildflower, herb
Daffodil bulbs garden flower
Daphne bark, berries, leaves ornamental shrub
Day lily entire plant is toxic to cats garden & wildflower
Death Camas leaves, stems, seeds, flowers field herb
Delphinium (Larkspur) entire plant esp. sprouts wildflower
Dumbcane entire plant house plant
Dutchman's breeches roots, foliage wild & garden flower
Easter lily entire plant is toxic to cats flowering house plant
Elderberry leaves, bark, roots, buds tree
Elephant's ear entire plant house plant
English Ivy entire plant esp. leaves, berries ornamental vine
European Bittersweet entire plant esp. berries vine
False Flax seeds wild herb
False hellebore roots, leaves, seeds ornamental flower
Fan weed seeds wildflower, herb
Field peppergrass seeds wildflower, herb
Flax seedpods wildflower, herb
Foxglove leaves wild & garden flower
Holly berries shrub
Horsechestnut nuts, sprouts tree
Horse nettle entire plant esp. berries wildflower, herb
Hyacinth bulbs wild & house plant
Iris leaves, roots wild & garden flower
Jack-in-the-pulpit entire plant esp. roots, leaves wildflower
Jatropha seeds tree, shrub
Jerusalem Cherry unripe fruit, foliage ornamental plant
Jimsonweed entire plant esp. seeds field plant
Laburum seeds, pods, flowers ornamental plant
Lantana foliage house plant
Larkspur young plants wildflower
Laurels leaves shrub
Lily of the valley leaves, flowers garden & wildflower
Lupines seeds, pods shrub
Manchineel Tree sap, fruit tree
Matrimony vine leaves, shoots ornamental vine
Mayapple unripe fruit, roots, foliage wildflower
Milk vetch entire plant wildflower
Mistletoe berries house plant
Monkshood entire plant esp. roots, seeds wildflower
Moonseed fruit, roots vine
Morning glory seeds, roots wildflower
Mountain mahogany leaves shrub
Mustards seeds wildflower
Narcissus bulbs garden flower
Nicotiana leaves garden flower
Nightshade leaves, berries wildflower, vine
Oaks shoots, leaves tree
Oleander leaves ornamental shrub
Philodendrons entire plant house plant
Pokeweed roots, seeds, berries field plant
Poinsettia leaves, stem, flowers house plant
Poison hemlock leaves, stem, fruit field plant
Potato shoots, sprouts garden plant
Rattle box entire plant wildflower
Rhododendron leaves ornamental shrub
Rhubarb leaves garden plant
Rosary pea seeds house plant
Skunk cabbage entire plant esp roots, leaves marsh plant
Smartweeds sap wildflower
Snow-on-the-mountain sap field plant
Sorghum leaves grass
Star of Bethlehem entire plant wildflower
Velvet grass leaves grass
Wild black cherry leaves, pits tree
Wild radish seeds wildflower
Wisteria pods, seeds ornamental plant
Woody aster entire plant wildflower
Yellow jessamine entire plant ornamental vine
Yellow oleander entire plant esp. leaves garden plant
Yellow pine flax entire plant esp. seedpods wildflower
Yew bark, leaves, seeds ornamental tree

Other good resources listing plants unsafe for pets are at Garden Forever and Plant Resources.

Xylitol Warning

Xylitol is a sugar alcohol -- an artificial sweetener created from birch, raspberries, plums and corn. This sweetener is found in many human "sugar free" products, such as gum, candies and other sweets. In humans, high doses may have a mild laxative effect, but in dogs, ingestion could be fatal.

It has been known for quite some time that there is a link between xylitol ingestion and hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) in dogs. Now, with the prevalence of this sweeter in human foods, the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center has noted a connection between xylitol consumption and acute toxicity in dogs. Xylitol has also been suspected of causing toxicity in ferrets.

Signs of toxicity can be seen as quickly as 30 minutes after xylitol ingestion in dogs. The xylitol causes a rapid release of the hormone insulin, causing a sudden decrease in blood glucose. This in turn may cause the following symptoms:

  • Vomiting
  • Weakness
  • Ataxia (uncoordinated movements)
  • Depression
  • Hypokalemia (decreased potassium)
  • Seizures
  • Coma
  • Liver dysfunction and/or failure

Xylitol is found in many products
The most common xylitol item is sugar-free gum. Gum can be found everywhere, and is often tempting to dogs. Keep gum out of reach - watch out for open pockets, purses, counter tops, and in the car. Xylitol can also be found in sugar-free (low carb and diabetic) candies, baked goods, some pharmaceuticals and many dental products, including mouthwashes, mints and toothpastes. Only use
pet toothpaste for pets, never human toothpaste.

If you suspect that your pet has eaten a xylitol-containing sweet or food, please contact your veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center immediately.

Above information from http://vetmedicine.about.com

Back to home

We are a tax-deductible 170(c)(1) agency. Tax ID No. 910819427 
Site designed and maintained by Animal Services
2003-2011 Animal Services. All rights reserved.
Revised: 04/01/11